Classic Very Rare

Mary Pickford Very Rare Autographed Letter Bob Hope Classic Wild Blue Yonder'77

Mary Pickford Very Rare Autographed Letter Bob Hope Classic Wild Blue Yonder'77
Mary Pickford Very Rare Autographed Letter Bob Hope Classic Wild Blue Yonder'77
Mary Pickford Very Rare Autographed Letter Bob Hope Classic Wild Blue Yonder'77
Mary Pickford Very Rare Autographed Letter Bob Hope Classic Wild Blue Yonder'77
Mary Pickford Very Rare Autographed Letter Bob Hope Classic Wild Blue Yonder'77
Mary Pickford Very Rare Autographed Letter Bob Hope Classic Wild Blue Yonder'77
Mary Pickford Very Rare Autographed Letter Bob Hope Classic Wild Blue Yonder'77

Mary Pickford Very Rare Autographed Letter Bob Hope Classic Wild Blue Yonder'77    Mary Pickford Very Rare Autographed Letter Bob Hope Classic Wild Blue Yonder'77

Comes up with original envelope. Born Gladys Smith, Mary Pickford appeared in 51 films for D. Griffith in 1909 and 49 in 1910 -- while she was still a teenager! Known as "America's Sweetheart", she was the first Hollywood superstar - and millionaire at age 24! Pickford and Fairbanks, who were married in 1920, separated in 1933 and divorced in 1936.

Mary Pickford appeared in 51 films in 1909 almost one a week. While at Biograph, she suggested to Florence La Badie to "try pictures", invited her to the studio and later introduced her to D.

Griffith, who launched La Badie's career. In January 1910, Pickford traveled with a Biograph crew to Los Angeles. Many other film companies wintered on the West Coast, escaping the weak light and short days that hampered winter shooting in the East. Pickford added to her 1909 Biographs (Sweet and Twenty, They Would Elope, and To Save Her Soul, to name a few) with films made in California. Actors were not listed in the credits in Griffith's company. Audiences noticed and identified Pickford within weeks of her first film appearance. Exhibitors, in turn, capitalized on her popularity by advertising on sandwich boards that a film featuring "The Girl with the Golden Curls", "Blondilocks", or "The Biograph Girl" was inside.

Ickford left Biograph in December 1910. The following year, she starred in films at Carl Laemmle's Independent Moving Pictures Company (IMP). IMP was absorbed into Universal Pictures in 1912, along with Majestic. Some of her best performances were in his films, such as Friends, The Mender of Nets, Just Like a Woman, and The Female of the Species.

That year, Pickford also introduced Dorothy and Lillian Gish whom she had befriended as new neighbors from Ohioto Griffithand each became major silent film stars, in comedy and tragedy, respectively. Pickford made her last Biograph picture, The New York Hat, in late 1912. This was a major turning point in her career. Pickford, who had always hoped to conquer the Broadway stage, discovered how deeply she missed film acting.

In 1913, she decided to work exclusively in film. The previous year, Adolph Zukor had formed Famous Players in Famous Plays. It was later known as Famous Players-Lasky and then Paramount Pictures, one of the first American feature film companies. Pickford left the stage to join Zukor's roster of stars. Zukor believed film's potential lay in recording theatrical players in replicas of their most famous stage roles and productions.

Zukor first filmed Pickford in a silent version of A Good Little Devil. The film, produced in 1913, showed the play's Broadway actors reciting every line of dialogue, resulting in a stiff film that Pickford later called one of the worst [features] I ever made...

Zukor agreed; he held the film back from distribution for a year. Pickford's work in material written for the camera by that time had attracted a strong following. Comedy-dramas, such as In the Bishop's Carriage (1913), Caprice (1913), and especially Hearts Adrift (1914), made her irresistible to moviegoers.

Hearts Adrift was so popular that Pickford asked for the first of her many publicized pay raises based on the profits and reviews. [17] The film marked the first time Pickford's name was featured above the title on movie marquees. Tess of the Storm Country was released five weeks later.

Biographer Kevin Brownlow observed that the film "sent her career into orbit and made her the most popular actress in America, if not the world". Her appeal was summed up two years later by the February 1916 issue of Photoplay as "luminous tenderness in a steel band of gutter ferocity". Only Charlie Chaplin, who slightly surpassed Pickford's popularity in 1916, had a similarly spellbinding pull with critics and the audience. Each enjoyed a level of fame far exceeding that of other actors.

Throughout the 1910s and 1920s, Pickford was believed to be the most famous woman in the world, or, as a silent-film journalist described her, "the best known woman who has ever lived, the woman who was known to more people and loved by more people than any other woman that has been in all history". Pickford starred in 52 features throughout her career. Occasionally, she played a child, in films such as The Poor Little Rich Girl (1917), Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm (1917), Daddy-Long-Legs (1919) and Pollyanna (1920).

Pickford's fans were devoted to these "little girl" roles, but they were not typical of her career. Due to her lack of a normal childhood, she enjoyed making these pictures. Given how small she was at under five feet, and her naturalistic acting abilities, she was very successful in these roles. When he first met her in person as a boy, assumed she was a new playmate for him, and asked her to come and play trains with him, which she obligingly did.

She declined, and went to First National Pictures, which agreed to her terms. In 1919, Pickford, along with D. Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, and Douglas Fairbanks, formed the independent film production company United Artists. Through United Artists, Pickford continued to produce and perform in her own movies; she could also distribute them as she chose. During this period, she also made Little Annie Rooney (1925), another film in which Pickford played a child, Sparrows (1926), which blended the Dickensian with newly minted German expressionist style, and My Best Girl (1927), a romantic comedy featuring her future husband Buddy Rogers. The arrival of sound was her undoing. Pickford underestimated the value of adding sound to movies, claiming that "adding sound to movies would be like putting lipstick on the Venus de Milo". She played a reckless socialite in Coquette (1929), a role for which her famous ringlets were cut into a 1920s' bob.

Pickford had already cut her hair in the wake of her mother's death in 1928. Fans were shocked at the transformation. Pickford's hair had become a symbol of female virtue, and when she cut it, the act made front-page news in The New York Times and other papers.

Coquette was a success and won her an Academy Award for Best Actress, although this was highly controversial. The public failed to respond to her in the more sophisticated roles. Like most movie stars of the silent era, Pickford found her career fading as talkies became more popular among audiences. Her next film, The Taming of The Shrew, made with husband Douglas Fairbanks, was not well received at the box office. [28] Established Hollywood actors were panicked by the impending arrival of the talkies.

On March 29, 1928, The Dodge Brothers Hour was broadcast from Pickford's bungalow, featuring Fairbanks, Chaplin, Norma Talmadge, Gloria Swanson, John Barrymore, D. Griffith, and Dolores del Rio, among others. They spoke on the radio show to prove that they could meet the challenge of talking movies. A transition in the roles Pickford selected came when she was in her late 30s, no longer able to play the children, teenage spitfires, and feisty young women so adored by her fans, and was not suited for the glamorous and vampish heroines of early sound. In 1933, she underwent a Technicolor screen test for an animated/live action film version of Alice in Wonderland, but Walt Disney discarded the project when Paramount released its own version of the book.

Only one Technicolor still of her screen test still exists. She retired from acting in 1933; her last acting film was released in 1934.

She continued to produce for others, however, including Sleep, My Love (1948; with Claudette Colbert) and Love Happy (1949), with the Marx Brothers. Mary Pickford giving President Herbert Hoover a ticket for a film industry benefit for the unemployed, 1931.

Pickford used her stature in the movie industry to promote a variety of causes. Although her image depicted fragility and innocence, she proved to be a strong businesswoman who took control of her career in a cutthroat industry.

During World War I she promoted the sale of Liberty Bonds, making an intensive series of fund-raising speeches, beginning in Washington, D. Five days later she spoke on Wall Street to an estimated 50,000 people. She was christened the U. Navy's official "Little Sister"; the Army named two cannons after her and made her an honorary colonel.

At the end of World War I, Pickford conceived of the Motion Picture Relief Fund, an organization to help financially needy actors. In 1932, Pickford spearheaded the "Payroll Pledge Program", a payroll-deduction plan for studio workers who gave one half of one percent of their earnings to the MPRF. An astute businesswoman, Pickford became her own producer within three years of her start in features. According to her Foundation, "she oversaw every aspect of the making of her films, from hiring talent and crew to overseeing the script, the shooting, the editing, to the final release and promotion of each project". She demanded (and received) these powers in 1916, when she was under contract to Zukor's Famous Players in Famous Plays (later Paramount). Zukor acquiesced to her refusal to participate in block-booking, the widespread practice of forcing an exhibitor to show a bad film of the studio's choosing to also be able to show a Pickford film. In 1916, Pickford's films were distributed, singly, through a special.

The Mary Pickford Corporation was briefly Pickford's motion-picture production company. In 1919, she increased her power by co-founding United Artists (UA) with Charlie Chaplin, D. Griffith, and her soon-to-be husband, Douglas Fairbanks. Before UA's creation, Hollywood studios were vertically integrated, not only producing films but forming chains of theaters. Distributors (also part of the studios) arranged for company productions to be shown in the company's movie venues.

Filmmakers relied on the studios for bookings; in return they put up with what many considered creative interference. United Artists broke from this tradition. It was solely a distribution company, offering independent film producers access to its own screens as well as the rental of temporarily unbooked cinemas owned by other companies.

Pickford and Fairbanks produced and shot their films after 1920 at the jointly owned Pickford-Fairbanks studio on Santa Monica Boulevard. The producers who signed with UA were true independents, producing, creating and controlling their work to an unprecedented degree.

As a co-founder, as well as the producer and star of her own films, Pickford became the most powerful woman who has ever worked in Hollywood. By 1930, Pickford's acting career had largely faded. [26] After retiring three years later, however, she continued to produce films for United Artists. She and Chaplin remained partners in the company for decades. The item "Mary Pickford Very Rare Autographed Letter Bob Hope Classic Wild Blue Yonder'77" is in sale since Monday, August 23, 2021.

This item is in the category "Entertainment Memorabilia\Autographs-Original\Movies\Cards & Papers". The seller is "pengang" and is located in Marietta, Georgia.

This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Object Type: Cards & Paper
  • Industry: Movies

Mary Pickford Very Rare Autographed Letter Bob Hope Classic Wild Blue Yonder'77    Mary Pickford Very Rare Autographed Letter Bob Hope Classic Wild Blue Yonder'77